Jumpstart Your Visual Narrative Skills, Enhance your Graphic Novel or Comic, & Become a Better Storyteller Mood and emotion are powerful tools for visual artists and pushing your understanding of materials in service to those emotive tools is critical in all facets of visual storytelling. It is vital to create a visual feel for your imagery that is appropriate for the subject or narrative at hand. This is true of individual paintings and illustrations, and especially true for projects that convey a mood or emotion through multiple images such as graphic novels, comics, and Illustrated books. For example; a portrait can convey a mood or emotion based on the choice wet or dry media. A pen and ink image can drive home multiple meanings through the use of different calligraphy or mark making, each putting stress on different aspects of the image and the overall emotion being conveyed.The concept of an illustration could be as simple as the mood or emotion that it depicts, and the choice of media is essential for driving home those elements. Seemingly disparate techniques can be incredible visual touchstones in an extended work to illustrate different time periods, or dreams, or points of view from character to character. The possibilities are endless. How to decide which to use? Through the use of life experience, observation, sketchbook, research, photography and studio practices George will demonstrate his journey in creating a visual direction / look for a narrative or non-narrative body of work. George will show examples of previous projects and give demonstrations on the use of various materials. Students will choose a direction for their assignment, either narrative or non-narrative and be given an explanation on how to develop through process to completion. Emphasis will be placed on media exploration and establishing a visual solution for the project.  

Jumpstart Your Visual Narrative Skills, Enhance your Graphic Novel or Comic, & Become a Better Storyteller

Mood and emotion are powerful tools for visual artists and pushing your understanding of materials in service to those emotive tools is critical in all facets of visual storytelling.

It is vital to create a visual feel for your imagery that is appropriate for the subject or narrative at hand. This is true of individual paintings and illustrations, and especially true for projects that convey a mood or emotion through multiple images such as graphic novels, comics, and Illustrated books. For example; a portrait can convey a mood or emotion based on the choice wet or dry media. A pen and ink image can drive home multiple meanings through the use of different calligraphy or mark making, each putting stress on different aspects of the image and the overall emotion being conveyed.The concept of an illustration could be as simple as the mood or emotion that it depicts, and the choice of media is essential for driving home those elements. Seemingly disparate techniques can be incredible visual touchstones in an extended work to illustrate different time periods, or dreams, or points of view from character to character. The possibilities are endless. How to decide which to use?

Through the use of life experience, observation, sketchbook, research, photography and studio practices George will demonstrate his journey in creating a visual direction / look for a narrative or non-narrative body of work. George will show examples of previous projects and give demonstrations on the use of various materials. Students will choose a direction for their assignment, either narrative or non-narrative and be given an explanation on how to develop through process to completion. Emphasis will be placed on media exploration and establishing a visual solution for the project.

 

Jumpstart Your Visual Narrative Skills, Enhance your Graphic Novel or Comic, & Become a Better Storyteller

Saturdays, March 11, 18, & 25, 2017
2 pm - 5 pm CST

Mood and emotion are powerful tools for visual artists and pushing your understanding of materials in service to those emotive tools is critical in all facets of visual storytelling.

It is vital to create a visual feel for your imagery that is appropriate for the subject or narrative at hand. This is true of individual paintings and illustrations, and especially true for projects that convey a mood or emotion through multiple images such as graphic novels, comics, and Illustrated books. For example; a portrait can convey a mood or emotion based on the choice wet or dry media. A pen and ink image can drive home multiple meanings through the use of different calligraphy or mark making, each putting stress on different aspects of the image and the overall emotion being conveyed.The concept of an illustration could be as simple as the mood or emotion that it depicts, and the choice of media is essential for driving home those elements. Seemingly disparate techniques can be incredible visual touchstones in an extended work to illustrate different time periods, or dreams, or points of view from character to character. The possibilities are endless. How to decide which to use?

Through the use of life experience, observation, sketchbook, research, photography and studio practices George will demonstrate his journey in creating a visual direction / look for a narrative or non-narrative body of work. George will show examples of previous projects and give demonstrations on the use of various materials. Students will choose a direction for their assignment, either narrative or non-narrative and be given an explanation on how to develop through process to completion. Emphasis will be placed on media exploration and establishing a visual solution for the project.

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Have returned from my trip to Morocco and am hard at work on paintings inspired by the sights. Thank you to everyone who helped make this dream trip possible through purchases in my shops. I couldn't have done it without you! The trip was wonderful and every person I met there was incredibly nice.
I hope to be posting some of the work soon. To read about the trip visit my blog Murmurs
I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season!
George Pratt.